UK gets an offer it cannot refuse

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Our look at 2020’s COP hosts

We have the winner(s)! The UK and Italy joined forces to organise one of the most important climate events: the first climate change negotiations with the Paris Agreement having entered into force in 2020. Italy will be having the lighter pre-COP meeting, most likely in Milan, while the UK will host the COP. Extinction rebellion must be very happy and starting to plan a London lockdown.
Climate Tracker did an in-depth analysis to help you decide which will be the best meeting to attend. You might want to start familiarising with the Italian “quarto d’ora accademico” rule.

 

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Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed

You may remember this motto from the past years negotiating the rulebook, and this still applies to the current ongoing meeting in Bonn.
The main issue of these days in Bonn is known as “Article 6”, and covers market mechanisms and non-market approaches to reducing greenhouse gases.
One of the other issues being discussed are creating common reporting tables (or formats) for the transparency framework. Countries have to report on their greenhouse gas emissions or the implementation of their climate plans under the Paris Agreement – but how this reporting is done (is it a document? A table? Quantitative? How is it flexible for developing countries?) still has to be defined.

Problem is: these two issues (reporting tables and market mechanisms) clash with each other. For example, how do I report on emission reductions if I used a market exchange to reach my targets? Countries are worried that if this is not carefully looked at, negotiations may be overlapping or pre-empting results. And that lead to a bit of shouting. Ups.
For now, the heads of delegation decided that they will give priority to negotiating Article 6, to make sure this does not clash with the other issues. Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.

Broader world news

Justin Trudeau is now planning to fund Canada’s “transition to a green economy” with a $5.5 billion Trans Mountain pipeline. This comes in the same week as Trudeau announcing a “Climate Emergency” in Canada as scientists confirmed that the Canadian Tundra is melting 70 years ahead of schedule: “It is in Canada’s national interest to protect our environment and invest in tomorrow, while making sure people can feed their families today,” he said.
A new study by Nature Climate Change concludes that 40% of primates are at threat because of extrreme weather events and raising temperatures.
Trump announced his 2020 bid claiming “Our air and water are the cleanest they’ve ever been by far”. Surely backed by scientific data.

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